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Uncovering Quality Score

| ‎22-07-2013 04:00 PM

Hi there,

 

Quality Score - It’s more of an art than a science, and there isn’t an exact methodology you can utilize to increase it as all AdWords accounts and campaigns are different. Within AdWords I find quality to be one of the more frequently discussed numbers and from reasons typically stemming from frustration at attempting to increase the score to no avail.

 

There are certainly certainly some steps you can take to improve quality score. I thought it’d be interesting to highlight some facts regarding quality score which are less frequently known.

 

  • You won’t automatically get a high quality score from keyword stuffing. Some things to keep in mind are the following: is the content of your ad prominent on your site and not buried, do you feature original content, and is your business model clear?

  • Only exact match keyword data on Google Search is used to determine a keyword’s quality score. This means clicks happening on phrase or broad match keywords do not factor into QS.

  • The quality rating (1-10) given to keywords is reflective of its performance with all text ads in an ad group. Getting rid of poor performing ads is a good strategy as one low performing ad can lower the overall quality score of a keyword.

  • Quality score of zero impression keywords have no effect on quality score as they have no impression data. Also, we do normalize quality score by position (i.e. we don’t expect CTR to be as high in position 11 versus 2).

  • Lastly, you should keep in mind to there needs to be a statistically significant set of data to calculate quality score. This means one day of terrible or great performance will not necessarily ruin or help your QS.

 

Recently, I’ve been sharing a helpful article from our AdWords Help Center with advertiser who call or email our support team which outlines 10 things you should know about ads quality. Everyone has found it to be a helpful read.

 

Now that we’ve uncovered a few unknown facts about quality score, what strategies have you found most effective in terms of increasing quality score? Feel free to share your best practices.


Juliana S.

Message 1 of 25 (3,899 Views)

Re: Uncovering Quality Score

Reply to JulianaS
| ‎23-07-2013 07:36 AM

I may just be misunderstanding the phrasing, but one item in your list was a little confusing:

"Only exact match keyword data on Google Search is used to determine a keyword’s quality score. This means clicks happening on phrase or broad match keywords do not factor into QS."

 

If this is the case, then why do phrase/broad match keywords have quality scores? I'm looking in several accounts right now and seeing what I always have - quality scores for all keywords, regardless of match-type.

Message 2 of 25 (3,840 Views)

Re: Uncovering Quality Score

Reply to Randy A
| ‎23-07-2013 12:48 PM
0

Hi Randy-

 

Great question. All keywords regardless of match type have quality scores; however, only when activity is coming from a search for exactly the keyword text will this be used to determine a keyword's quality score.

 

For example, if you have the broad match keyword 'hot dog' only searches for 'hot dog' will factor into QS. A search for 'Chicago-style hot dog' would not factor into the quality score for the broad match keyword 'hot dog.' I hope this helps clarify!

 

Let me know if you have further questions. 

 

Juliana S.

Message 3 of 25 (3,799 Views)

Re: Uncovering Quality Score

[ Edited ]
Reply to JulianaS
| ‎23-07-2013 02:47 PM
0
Last edited 23-07-2013 02:57 PM by Camilo Olea

Hi, Juliana!

 

I started administering an adwords account that had quite some challenges, i.e.: over 140 keywords for just 1 adgroup, no negative keywords, and quite a few more.

 

Obviously, when I first started optimizing it the quality scores were extremely low, as well as CTRs.

 

Here is a rundown of the before and after scenarios.

 

Before:

 

- 1 landing page for over 140 keywords.

 

- No negative keywords.

 

- 1 ad group.

 

- Most keywords were broad match.

 

After:

 

- Segmented different keywords into groups, and developed specific landing pages for each one. Including keywords in the landing page copy, titles, etc.

 

- Added a list of negatives.

 

- Grouped different keywords into different ad groups.

 

- Fine tuned keywords to add modified broad, phrase and exact matches. 

 

This resulted in Quality Scores going from 3/10 to 10/10 in many cases. CTRs also increased dramatically (from .0XX% to over 10% in some cases).

 

In my opinion, the most important part was dividing the original 140+ keyword list into groups, and developing specific landing pages with the keywords of each group in the copy.

 

Hope this helped, best regards!

Message 4 of 25 (3,760 Views)

Re: Uncovering Quality Score

Reply to JulianaS
| ‎23-07-2013 04:57 PM
0

Hi JulianaS,

Thanks for the excellent post and you are right that it does tend to be more of an art than a science at times but what really leads to the frustration is when it feels more like a crap shoot than an art. 

 

For example, with regards to the last two points you listed:

  • Quality score of zero impression keywords have no effect on quality score as they have no impression data. Also, we do normalize quality score by position (i.e. we don’t expect CTR to be as high in position 11 versus 2).

     

  • Lastly, you should keep in mind to there needs to be a statistically significant set of data to calculate quality score. This means one day of terrible or great performance will not necessarily ruin or help your QS.

 

With the above being the case, can you possibly explain why a keyword would start out with a QS of 1 even though it has had zero impressions and due to its low QS is now unable to generate any impressions.

 

"Your keyword isn't triggering ads to appear on Google right now due to a low Ad Rank. Ads are ranked based on your bid and Quality Score."

 

NOTE: It is a fairly common word with searches, highly relevant to the landing page, and highly relevant to the ad. Google grades it as:

  • Expected clickthrough rate: Below average
  • Ad relevance: Average
  • Landing page experience: Average

Granted this is a unique case and one that likely needs to be discussed with a rep but I was curious about any insight you may have since it relates to your post.

 

 

 

Message 5 of 25 (3,736 Views)

Re: Uncovering Quality Score

Reply to RobertCoats
| ‎24-07-2013 07:56 AM
0

Thanks for sharing @CamiloO.

 

@RobertCoats - This subject regarding newer keywords with lower quality scores is a great, and I think a shared experience for many users. To clarify, when we don't have performance history for a keyword (new keywords or keywords with zero impressions and clicks), our system relies on other attributes to assess the initial keyword's QS such as other advertisers who have performed poorly on the keyword, ad quality, overall account performance, and performance of past ad traffic on the same URL. Because this is just a preliminary quality score, it's always good to take a step back and allow the keywords some time to run. 

 

Looks like in the scenario you posed, the keywords aren't receiving any traffic due to low ad rank; however, the other component is going to be maximum CPC bids. It's probably a unique scenario where we'd need to look at the bidding, but increasing bids for the keyword should help in increasing the keyword's overall ad rank and allow it to win auctions and receive impressions. 

  

Juliana S. 

Message 6 of 25 (3,634 Views)

Re: Uncovering Quality Score

Reply to JulianaS
| ‎24-07-2013 02:15 PM
0
Hi Juliana,

About QS that only counts for clicks that come from an exact match of a keyword.
What happens to clicks and data which was received from broader matching of a Specific
keyword?
Those clicks still contribute to a higher CTR, which in turn should increase QS.
In what way the broader match clicks do contribute to the campaign?
Message 7 of 25 (3,601 Views)

Re: Uncovering Quality Score

Reply to Ronch
| ‎28-07-2013 12:50 PM
0
Hi,

Thats a great article! Thank you!
There are many factors and one important factor is relevancy. Relevancy between keywords and search terms associated with keywords. If search terms are closely matched with the keywords and exactly match with the keywords we surely gets good qs over the period of time. We need to have high exact match impressions share in order to get good quality score. I prefer to maintain relevancy, high ctr, top average position and high exact match impression share.

Thanks
Neha Gupta
Message 8 of 25 (3,400 Views)

Re: Uncovering Quality Score

Level 1
Reply to JulianaS
| ‎28-07-2013 07:12 PM
0
  • Only exact match keyword data on Google Search is used to determine a keyword’s quality score. This means clicks happening on phrase or broad match keywords do not factor into QS.

Based on that info, is this right?: I can use "dog hot" or "dog the hot" as a broad keyword. There will be almost zero searches for this weird term, but I can search it myself and click on it for a very high exact-match CTR. Then my quality score for the broad-match term "hot dog" will be based on the artificially high exact-match CTR.

 

I don't see how Google would allow this scenario.

Message 9 of 25 (3,379 Views)

Re: Uncovering Quality Score

Reply to JulianaS
| ‎28-07-2013 09:39 PM
Hi Juliana,
Thanks for sharing such a nice post. I did learn a lot from this post and also from 10 things ...

I just have one point to add wrt Landing page and Quality Score. I believe that by having proper Title, Meta Description, Meta Keywords, H1, H2, H3 tags, keyword vs content ratio should boost Quality Score for the keyword targeted for.


Thanks,
Balu
www.locsea.com/googleadwordsblog
Message 10 of 25 (3,352 Views)

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